Transparency

Ingenium Schools participates in the Universal Service Administration Company’s E-rate program to maximize funding for technology infrastructure and services for our schools. To receive E-rate discounts, all schools must follow this bidding and contract award process.

Ingenium Schools uses a competitive bidding process to identify and request the products and services needed so that potential providers can review those requests and submit bids for them. To open the process, Ingenium’s independent E-rate consultant posts an FCC Form 470 to the USAC (Universal Services Administrative Co.) website.

The entity that will run the competitive bidding process – the independent E-rate consultant that Ingenium has authorized to negotiate on it’s behalf with a Letter of Agency (LOA) – files an FCC Form 470 (Description of Services Requested and Certification) and must be prepared to receive and evaluate bids and negotiate with service providers.

After 28 days, the competitive bidding process is closed. Ingenium Schools E-rate consultant evaluates the bids received and selects the bid that is the most cost-effective for needed services. Many factors are considered in the evaluation, such as reliability of service, quality of work & tools, and timely response to need, but the price of the eligible products and services must be included as a factor and is weighted more heavily than any other single factor. Per the E-rate funding rules, the FCC Form 470 is always publicly available for the 28-day period before the competitive bidding process is closed and service providers are selected.

E-rate Program Application Process

Please visit our current procurement page for current requests for proposals (RFP).

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Pursuant to EdCode Chapter 2: Establishment of Charter Schools

Section 47605(d)(4)(D)

A charter school shall provide a parent or guardian, or a pupil if the pupil is 18 years of age or older, a copy of this notice at all of the following times:

  • (i) When a parent, guardian, or pupil inquires about enrollment.
  • (ii) Before conducting an enrollment lottery.
  • (iii) Before dis-enrollment of a pupil.

California students take several mandated statewide tests. These tests provide parents/guardians, teachers, and educators with information about how well students are learning and becoming college and career ready. The test results may be used for local, state, and federal accountability purposes.

California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress

Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium Assessments

The California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP) computer adaptive assessments are aligned with the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). English language arts/literacy (ELA) and mathematics tests are administered in grades three through eight and grade eleven to measure whether students are on track to college and career readiness. In grade eleven, results from the ELA and math assessments can be used as an indicator of college readiness.

California Science Tests (CAST)

The new, computer-based CAST measures student acquisition of the California Next Generation Science Standards. It is administered in grades five and eight, and once in high school. The new computer-based CAST replaces the California Standards Tests (CST) for Science.

California Alternate Assessments (CAA)

The computer-based CAA for ELA and CAA for mathematics is administered to students with the most significant cognitive disabilities in grades three through eight and grade eleven. Test items are aligned with the CCSS and are based on the Core Content Connectors. The instructionally embedded CAA for Science is administered in grades five and eight, and once in high school.

Standards-based Tests in Spanish (STS) for Reading/Language Arts

California offers the optional STS for Reading/Language Arts, which are multiple-choice tests that allow Spanish-speaking English learners to demonstrate their knowledge of the California content standards. The California Spanish Assessment (CSA) will replace the optional STS. The CSA will be a computer-based assessment that is aligned with the California CCSS en Español.
Pursuant to California Education Code Section 60615, parents/guardians may annually submit to the school a written request to excuse their child from any or all of the CAASPP assessments.

English Language Proficiency Assessments for California (ELPAC)

California will transition from the California English Language Development Test (CELDT) to the English Language Proficiency Assessments for California (ELPAC) in 2017–18. The ELPAC is aligned with the 2012 California English Language Development Standards. It consists of two separate English Language Proficiency (ELP) assessments: one for the initial identification of students as English learners and the other for the annual summative assessment to identify students’ English language proficiency level and to measure their progress in learning English.

Physical Fitness Test

The physical fitness test (PFT) for students in California schools is the FitnessGram. The main goal of the test is to help students in starting lifelong habits of regular physical activity. Students in grades five, seven, and nine take the fitness test.

Source: California Department of Education | January 2018

California’s academic standards—the things we want students to know and be able to do—are designed so students graduate ready for college and a career. One way we measure their progress is through the California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP) assessments. Students across California in grades 3–8 and high school take these assessments each spring. These tests were created specifically to gauge each student’s performance in English language arts/literacy (ELA), mathematics, and science (in grades five and eight). These tests measure the skills called for by the academic standards, including the ability to write clearly, think critically, and solve problems.

Ingenium students will be taking these assessments in the months of April and May. Your school will send home a detailed letter and schedule with specific dates.

In the summer months you will receive a score report, with each subject broken down into areas. The report shows how students are doing in each area and where they need help. Depending on these needs, teachers will use this information to provide targeted help to students to address their needs.

Please remember that the results from this test are not meant to tell the whole story. Your child’s scores are meant to be one of several ways for you and your child’s teacher to see how your student is progressing in school. Test scores, along with student report cards and teacher’s observations of your child’s performance in the classroom, are used together to form a complete picture of your child’s achievement.

To learn more about these tests, please visit CDE’s Test Score Guide Web site at http://www.testscoreguide.org/ca, which provides informative guides and test score descriptions as well as sample test items at different levels of difficulty.

Another great resource are the Practice and Training Tests, which can be found on the CDE’s Smarter Balanced Practice and Training Tests Web page at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/tg/sa/practicetest.asp. Here, parents can experience the kinds of questions that students will encounter on the tests.

Per Education Code section 60615 and Title 5, Section 852, “Notwithstanding any other provision of law, a parent’s or guardian’s written request to school officials to excuse his or her child from any or all parts of the assessments administered pursuant to this chapter shall be granted. Title 5, Section 852, states that each year, the local educational agency shall notify parents or guardians of their pupil’s participation in the statewide testing system and the parents’ right to request in writing to excuse their child from any or all parts of the assessments.”

If you would like to exempt your child from testing, please submit a written request to the school principal.

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Information

Each student and employee has a right to learn and work in an environment that is free from unlawful discrimination. No District student or employee shall be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subject to discrimination on the basis of actual or perceived sex, sexual orientation, gender, or gender identity or expression.

Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972 is one of several federal and state anti-discrimination laws that ensure equality in education. Title IX prohibits discrimination, harassment, exclusion, denial, limitation or separation based on sex or gender. Title IX applies to both male and female students in any educational institution receiving federal funding.

Pregnant students and teen parents have a right to equal education, full participation, and to enroll in any school or program for which they would otherwise qualify at any stage of the pregnancy.  They have the right to remain in their regular or current school program, including elementary or secondary schools, honors and magnet programs, special education and non-public school placements, alternative/options programs, migrant education, free and reduced lunch programs and services for English Learners, and any others for which they are otherwise qualified. This would also include participation in the following: graduation, awards, ceremonies; field trips; student clubs, councils, after-school activities, and any other school-related programs. Students cannot legally be expelled, suspended, or otherwise excluded from, or required to participate in school programs solely on the basis of their pregnancy-related conditions, or marital or parental status.

California Education Code Sections 200 through 282 and Los Angeles Unified School District Board Policy prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex, sexual orientation or gender. Title IX requires that every school district or institution have a Title IX/Bullying Complaint Manager to whom concerns or complaints regarding sex discrimination can be made.

Complaint Process

Click Here to Access the Ingenium Title IX Complaint Form

Students or parents/guardians should report their verbal or written Title IX complaint to the school administrator or Title IX/Bullying Complaint Manager within six months from the date the alleged incident occurred or first obtained knowledge. Complainants have a right to a timely and informal resolution at the school site.

If the complainant is dissatisfied with the school-site or Local District decision, the complainant may file a written Uniform Complaint Procedures (UCP) complaint directly with the Educational Equity Compliance Office. This will begin the investigation process which must be completed within 60 days. An appeal of the Educational Equity Compliance Office’s findings may be made to the California Department of Education – Office of Equal Opportunity.

Where Can Students/Parents Obtain Further Information or Assistance?

 

Who is the Title IX Coordinator for Ingenium Schools?

Ingenium Schools Title IX Compliance Manager

Melody Donnelly
P.O. Box 2642, Chino Hills, CA 91709
Phone: 888.660.6736
Email: mdonnelly@ingeniumschools.org

Where can I get more information on the rights of a pupil and the public and the responsibilities of the public school under Title IX?

The following Internet resources are available to find more information regarding rights and responsibilities under Title IX:

Los Angeles Unified School District’s Educational Equity Compliance Office

California Department of Education Office of Equal Opportunity

United States Department of Education Office for Civil Rights

Is there a statute of limitations for filing an alleged incident of harassment or discrimination?

Any parent, guardian, individual, organization has the right to file a written complaint of discrimination, harassment, intimidation, and/or bullying on the basis of a protected characteristic within six months from the date the alleged incident occurred or the complainant first obtained knowledge of the facts of the alleged incident.

How may a discrimination complaint be filed beyond the statute of limitations?

The timeline for filing a complaint of discrimination, harassment, intimidation, and/or bullying is extended by the Superintendent or designee, upon written request by the complainant setting forth the reasons for the extension. Such extension by the Superintendent or designee shall be made in writing. The period for filing may be extended by the Superintendent or designee for good cause for a period not to exceed 90 days following the expiration of the six month time period. The Superintendent shall respond immediately upon a receipt of a request for extension.

How are discrimination complaints investigated?

The District’s Educational Equity Compliance Office timestamps new complaints of discrimination, harassment, intimidation, and/or bullying when received and provides an acknowledgment letter framing the allegations under the jurisdiction of the Uniform Complaint Procedures (UCP) and referring a complainant to appropriate offices and resources for issues not under UCP jurisdiction. The investigator assigned has 60 calendar days from office receipt to investigate the complaint and to send a letter with findings to relevant parties. The 60-day timeline may be extended only by mutual agreement of the complainant and the District. During the investigative process, the investigator contacts complainant and other applicable parties requesting data and responses. The District includes an opportunity for the complainant to present evidence or information to support the allegations. The District will ensure that, within 60 days of receipt of the written complaint, the complaint has been resolved and/or investigated and that a written report of findings is issued to the complainant. The written report of the investigative findings contains the allegations, method of investigation, policy, findings, conclusions, appeal options and corrective actions, if applicable.

How may I file a discrimination complaint?

Any individual, public agency or organization may file a written complaint alleging a violation by the District of federal or state laws or regulations governing the programs and activities, as well as allegations of discrimination, harassment, intimidation, and/or bullying, under the District’s Uniform Complaint Procedures by sending the complaint to:

Educational Equity Compliance Office
333 S. Beaudry Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90017
Phone:  (213) 241-7682
Fax: (213) 241-3312
Email: EquityCompliance@lausd.net

 A complaint may be filed anonymously if it provides evidence or information leading to evidence to support an allegation of noncompliance.  Complainants making a verbal complaint shall be referred to an administrator/designee who will assist any person with a disability or unable to prepare a written complaint.

Otherwise, a discrimination complaint may be filed with the Office for Civil Rights:

San Francisco Office for Civil Rights
U.S. Department of Education
Phone:  (415) 486-5555
Email:  ocr.sanfrancisco@ed.gov